PRP, Feet and Footwear

 

From the Editor

The PRP Survival Guide is designed to be a repository of experiences and insights shared by PRP patients and their caregivers. Collectively, the PRP community possesses a wealth of practical knowledge about pityriasis rubra pilaris. Only we can harvest that knowledge. Share what you have learned about PRP and footwear as a patient or caregiver. Share what you have been told by your dermatologist? Share articles you feel might be worth reading or websites worth visiting. Use “Leave a Reply” to share.


Back in the Day When Newspaper Bags Were High-Tech

Many years ago when the PRP Facebook community had less than 200 members, sharing was the ONLY way we learned what worked and what didn’t.

Most of us with bleeding feet entombed in thick skin, applied messy ointment and creams and then wrapped them up in Saran Wrap or bags from the grocery store. Very low-tech, indeed. Then came a “sharing” from Greer C (Prince George County, Virginia). Her husband and Air Force veteran, Bill M had been suffering from PRP since late 2010. Like many of us, his feet were encased in cracking skin,  1/4-inch thick and prone to bleeding.

One day Greer had an epiphany. Actually, it was a more of an”observation on a rainy day” when their newspaper was delivered in a plastic sleeve. The bag was the perfect size to fit on Bill’s feet. Greer did some research and located the company that supplied them to the newspaper publisher, and she ordered a case. Bill has slept in them every night under tennis socks. They put 40% urea cream on the soles of his feet and under his toes and vaseline on the tops of his feet and then the bags and then socks for traction. It took several months, but his feet improved. No longer did he have thick skin. No longer did he get “those horrid cracks” under his toes or on his heels. Bill continued to use 40% urea cream to keep the skin and the soles of his feet soft. And every night it was lotion, bags, socks and sleep.


Swimming Socks: Alternative to Bags

Shout out to Kevin L (Godfrey, Illinois) and his sharing about his scuba socks. He wrote: “I have been trying everything to help with this and found a great option for me. SCUBA SOCKS for $15 on Ebay. Waterproof and keeps lotions in and not on your floors. They last a long time and are washable. NO MORE PLASTIC BAGS!! So comfortable. Make sure to get one size larger.

Mark U (Utica, Kentucky) seems to agree. “Where were you two years ago,: he noted. “I’m so much better now than then but oh how those would have saved the day. Thank you so much for this information for everyone. Swimming season is over in North Texas, but I will give these puppies a try. One of the remnants of my PRP journey (August 2012 to April 2014) is super-thin skin on my feet. Been wearing “water shoes” for years, but these look like they are worth a test ride. GOOGLE: swim socks Socks by the truckload


SOCKS & SHoe Sizes
Gail C (Virginia Beach, Virginia)
uses Vaseline on her feet and advises: . “Buy socks you won’t mind throwing away. I loaded up on socks from a local  Thrift Store.After a while they start looking grungy.
And more about shoe sizes. “Buy shoes that are two sizes too big and When you need to go out put on two pairs of socks.,” Gail advises.

Taking Showers with Feet that Cry

The PRP journey for Mark N (Galesburg, Michigan) began in May 2014. During a telephone conversation Mark lamented about the excruciating pain associated with taking a shower. He wasn’t talking about the water on his skin, he was talking about the soles of his feet. I told him we were kindred spirits in that regard and offered the following council. At six-foot three and 250 pounds, the agony of a shower was almost unbearable. The $8.00 flip-flops from Walmart worked for me and they worked for Mark as well.


Heel Socks: Possible Remedy for Cracked Heels

Andrea S (England) posted the following: “I am mostly clear of my PRP, but my heels still get dry and cracked. I bought these heel socks off ofAmazon and they are great. I also applied Kerasal ointment and have been sleeping in them. They really soften the feet and help with cracks!” xxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx



Peggy W (Hermitage, Tennessee). There is a silicone sock available which I tried. The problem was that my feet swelled so badly that the sock would cut off circulation and be very uncomfortable. My go-to footwear has been Crocs. They permit the swelling without pinching, allow good air circulation, and are easy to slip off under my desk when I have a moment to elevate my feet.

Editor’s  Note: While Crocs come in a rainbow of colors, including RAINBOW, it seems as if white Crocs would help conceal the relentless shedding of skin.


Jan T (Ringwood, New Jersey). Grocery bags did fine for me, but one morning I took them off and one foot was horribly discolored. I was very concerned about what new PRP symptom I’d developed until I realized one of the bags was inside out and the ink had rubbed off onto my skin.


Jan T (Ringwood, New Jersey). I got some wonderful “diabetic” socks from CVS (a US pharmacy chain). They are white, have padded soles, and stretchy tops. They handled the greasy lotions fine. Washed well. I wear them to this day! (They are not “compression socks” but just the opposite: super comfy and loose). Editor Note:

Editor’s Note — Here’s what CVS has to say. “Diabetic Comfort Socks are designed with anyone with special foot care needs in mind. The non-binding top ensure the sock is comfortable and doesnt cut off circulation. A smooth toe seam makes sure there your toes are most comfortable. A cushioned sole makes sure the sock that is comfortable all day long. A soft, polyester/cotton blend is treated to help resist bacterial odors while wicking moisture to keep your foot cool and dry. Men’s Size: 4-10  Women’s Size: 5-9.”

 

4 Replies to “PRP, Feet and Footwear”

  1. Great suggestions! Grocery bags did fine for me, but one morning I took them off and one foot was horribly discolored. I was very concerned about what new symptom I’d developed until I realized one of the bags was inside out and the ink had rubbed off onto my skin. Editor Note: ADDED TO ARTICLE. I might even toss it into the HUMOUR page. what a hoot!

    I used a “cheese grater” style device to get rid of some of the excess thick skin on my feet after softening them in the bath with Epsom salts. It made a very satisfying pile of flakes on the floor but off my heels and toes. Editor Note: Going to create a section on SKIN REMOVAL STRATEGIES and a “WARNING” sign to go along with it.

  2. I have found these under socks at night to be an effective replacement for grocery sacks.

    Noverlife 200PCS Large Clear Plastic Disposable Booties, Large Paraffin Wax Foot Covers Paraffin Bath Therapy Feet Liners Pro Cozy Liners Foot Hot Wax Spa

  3. There is a silicone sock available which I tried. The problem was that my feet swelled so badly that the sock would cut off circulation and be very uncomfortable. My go-to footwear has been Crocs. They permit the swelling without pinching, allow good air circulation, and are easy to slip off under my desk when I have a moment to elevate my feet. Editor: Thanks for sharing. Added to Feedback above.

  4. I got some wonderful “diabetic” socks from CVS (a US pharmacy chain). They are white, have padded soles, and stretchy tops. They handled the greasy lotions fine. Washed well. I wear them to this day! (They are not “compression socks” but just the opposite: super comfy and loose). Editor: Thanks for sharing. Added to Feedback above.

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